Deathbird Stories by Harlan Ellison and American Gods by Neil Gaiman

This is bit of followup to Lastech’s Midnight Madness discussion of Malpertuis.

Harlan Ellison wrote Deathbird Stories in 1975  It contains 19 short stories that took him ten years to write.  The book looks at what happens when the old gods are replaced by new ones.   Computers, money, and isolation are just a few.

Ellison has a comment at the beginning of the book.  He suggests that the reader not attempt to read the entire book at once.  I would agree.  The writer deals with facets of our humanity that are not always pretty and nice.  It’s good to take the time to digest and think about it.

Along The Scenic Route is about road rage with a twist.

Paingod Ellison answers his own question of:

If God is good, why does He send us pain and misery?

The Deathbird What if Genesis was wrong and things happened a bit differently?

Be aware that the book is NOT for children and does explore some adult themes.  It’s well worth tracking down though.  Lucky for me,  I’ve been able to bring it in from the library.  The San Francisco Public Library is a wonder and if they don’t have the book I want, they will bring it in from elsewhere.

This book gets 5 claws.

American Gods by Neil Gaiman was winner of the Hugo and Nebula awards in 2002.  It, too follows the theme of old gods being replaced by new ones.  The old ones are dying off, but a war is brewing.  It’s quite a good read and you’ll have fun figuring out who all the gods are.

This book gets 4 claws


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2 Replies to “Deathbird Stories by Harlan Ellison and American Gods by Neil Gaiman”

  1. I prefer Richard Matheson to Ellison, personally. Matheson has some very good characterizations, keen psychological touches. I was also going to mention that if you enjoy Lovecraft, you ought to check out Jean Ray. I’ll be looking to your thunderbird story, and thanks for the comment!

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