Fun With Talking Cats

The first video speaks for itself…pun intended.  I laughed a lot when I saw first saw it.

This second video is a Sphynx cat talking to the birds. Kitsy sounds like that whenever he is in the kitchen window.

The Japanese Tea Garden in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park: Part 3

This is part three. Parts one and two can be fund here.

One morning we woke up to rain. It’s the rainy season in San Francisco. It wasn’t a heavy rain, but it was enough. We had wanted to get out and walk and so we debated. We suddenly realized that we had not been to the Japanese Tea Garden In Golden Gate Park for quite a while and that the rain would keep the crowds down.

Japanese Tea Garden
Pagoda

Continue reading “The Japanese Tea Garden in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park: Part 3”

Tuesday night cat vids

Looking for a bit of humor and silliness today, I decided to just post a couple of cat vids. These are two of my favorites.

This is An Engineer’s Guide to Cats.  I’m quite the fan of these guys and their vids.

And now, for the Mean Kitty song.

The Piano Tuner of Earthquakes

The piano tuner of earthquakes” – (2005, Germany/United Kingdom/France)

“Tarkovsky for me is the greatest [director], the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as a reflection, life as a dream”.

This quote from Ingmar Bergman about Andrei Tarkovksy applies to few directors, whose films are like echoes which never fade, feeling of déjà vu from things you’ve never seen.

Can there be a more “controlled” medium than animation, I don’t know. But this may be the most interesting dichotomy (or seeming contradiction) about the Quay brothers, in that they will show you elaborate images for your imagination to use as canvass and subject.

They seem to shy away from the notion of script, well maybe not shy away, so much as discard. I think they see scripting as restrictive to the creative process of story telling: the characters as well as the decors are enabled to follow their own rhythm and narration.

This, of course, is how most of us dream.
The Quay brothers’ second film, as their shorts and previous feature, is not easily described. They themselves appear like 18th century automatons, speaking in the halting way of people born into a world of opinions, hostile to developing ideas.

Their literary, visual and musical references are just this side off mainstream, not obscure so much as… Uncommon yet surprisingly attainable, and are woven in loose tapestries which invite you to pull whichever string twitches tantalizingly, following yet another rabbit hole of sorts: the décor itself is an actor.

The piano tuner of earthquakes” would I think appeal to anyone who truly enjoyed Cocteau’s “Beauty and the Beast”, Guillermo del Toro’s “Pan’s Labyrinth”, Tim Burton’s “nightmare before Christmas” or Tarkovsky’s “Stalker”.

To try and outline a synopsis, or post pictures or a trailer, in the case their movies would be restrictive and so I do not. Instead I would simply tell you that if you have read this far, you will likely want to continue this dialogue by watching the Quay brothers’ oeuvre.
“The piano tuner of earthquakes”… Such a title, and it is just the beginning.

Brothers Quay by Mariusz Kubik (photographer)
Brothers Quay by Mariusz Kubik (photographer)

This movie gets the five beans

5 beans


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The Japanese Tea Garden in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park: Part 2

This is part two.  Part one can be found here.

One morning we woke up to rain. It’s the rainy season in San Francisco. It wasn’t a heavy rain, but it was enough. We had wanted to get out and walk and so we debated. We suddenly realized that we had not been to the Japanese Tea Garden in Golden Gate Park for quite a while and that the rain would keep the crowds down.

Japanese Tea Garden
Cranes

Continue reading “The Japanese Tea Garden in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park: Part 2”

Not a review as of yet: Rubber, a modern drama

This French movie, filmed in the U.S., will hopefully be available on DVD in coming months. I doubt it will gain exposure in theatres as the subject matter is likely too  dark and depressing, but the trailer alone hints at a masterpiece.

“Rubber” is the story of Robert who, wandering through the desert, gains awareness and special, powerful, psychic powers. One central theme of “rubber” is extermination, you may even call it genocide.

You see, Robert is a used tire. A car tire. Rolling aimlessly, unknowingly, through the desertic landscapes of the American Southwest, discarded. Used up. Until that moment when Robert rolls up languidly to a junkyard where humans are burning stacks of old tires: Robert’s kin. From then on, Robert’s burgeoning psychic powers will hone themselves into a weapon which he will turn against this humanity who created his people only to reject them after 40.000 miles or less.

Robert found his mission.

Here is just one of the trailers.


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